DICOTOMÍA DIONISIO-APOLO

arouro

UN BREVE TESTO-SULLA LOTTA A MORTE TRA L’INDIVIDUO DIONISIACO:MAI PRONO AL FINALISMO- ALL’IMMUTABILITÀ DELLA VITA- E  DELL’ASSOLUTO- E L’INDIVIDUALITÀ APOLLINEA:EGO-RAZIONALE- FISSA E IMMOBILE  NELLA SUA ARMONIA FATTA DI  VALORI COMUNI E EGUALI.

El pensador alemán, realiza su meditación acerca de la visión del hombre con respecto a la vida desde una óptica dual, tomando como referencia dos elementos mitológicos de la Grecia antigua, él se refiere a las figuras de Dionisio y Apolo, el primero representa el dios de los campos, del vino, de la fiesta, mientras que el segundo es el dios arquetipo de belleza, orden, racionalidad. En su análisis Nietzsche, expone la polaridad entre las visiones de mundo a partir de ambos lentes, dionisíaco y apolíneo.

Espíritu Apolíneo: Formal, Armonía, Racionalidad, Intelecto, Inmovilidad, Muerte, Intenta comprender al mundo

Espíritu Dionisiaco: Creativo, Exaltación, Fuerza vital, Instinto, Devenir, Vida, Acepta al mundo

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ABYSSES OF AMOR FATI

LOVES OF FATE

Yet amor fati is not only characterised by the ability to transfigure one’s own suffering; it is also a positive state. Nietzsche indicates that ‘a full and powerful soul not only copes with painful, even terrible losses, deprivations, (…); it emerges from such hells with a greater fullness and powerfulness; and most essential of all, with a new increase in the blissfulness of love’. (WP §352) How is such an ‘increase’ experienced? Another passage indicates that from the ‘abysses’ of suffering, one returns ‘newborn, more ticklish and malicious, with a more delicate taste for joy, (…) with merrier senses (…) more childlike and yet a hundred times subtler than before’ (GS: 37, my italics) The increased strength, sensitivity and lucidity brought upon us by suffering do not disappear with the pain itself.

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LA PAROLA DEL DIVENIRE

MITODIVEN

Nietzsche rileva come il problema fondamentale che assilla la grecità arcaica sia invece quello di riuscire a spiegare cause e modalità del divenire, dell’instabilità del movimento cosmico che tanto preoccupa gli uomini per la sua imprevedibilità, le trasformazioni che apporta alla vita, al mondo, alle persone, nella enigmatica alternanza di vita e morte, crescita e diminuzione, alternanza di giorno e notte, stagioni, fenomeni atmosferici e esistenziali.

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ANTITHESIS OF AMOR FATI

LOVES OF FATE

Nietzsche is more explicit about resignation, which is presented as the antithesis of amor fati: ‘such an experimental philosophy as I live anticipates even the possibilities of the most fundamental nihilism: but this does not mean that it must halt at a negation, a No, a will to negation. It wants to cross over to the opposite of this (…) ⎯ my formula for this is amor fati.

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AGAPIC AMOR FATI

LOVES OF FATE

Amor fati is now presented in the first person, and not as an ideal but as a realised state (‘my inmost nature’, ‘the bottom of my nature’). Nietzsche does not offer any reasons to try to convince us of the desirability of loving fate, but a reflective description of how things appear to someone who is in such a state.

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THE POTENTIAL LOVER OF FATE II

LOVES OF FATE

Amor fati now receives its maximal extension: we must not only love what is necessary, but love its return. There is much secondary literature on the eternal return and my intention here is not to enter the various debates for their own sake. I am only interested in understanding the practical role that it performs in relation to amor fati. From the perspective of erotic love, the most obvious possibility is to see the eternal return as a radical method to develop our ability to see what is necessary as beautiful.

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THE POTENTIAL LOVER OF FATE

LOVES OF FATE

One way of reading this passage would interpret it as presupposing an erotic conception of love according to which we love objects in proportion to their perceived value (hence the need to learn ‘more and more’) and as offering a Platonic solution to the first paradox (amor fati as the love of a repellent object).

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LOVE OF FATE

LOVES OF FATE

There is no doubt that Nietzsche considered the theme of amor fati [love of fate] of essential importance: he referred to it in his later work as his ‘formula for greatness in a human being’, ‘the highest state a philosopher can attain’, or again his ‘inmost nature’.

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